Phot-O-Types in The Typewriter Revolution

Last year, I published a how-to article on how to make what I jokingly call Phot-O-Types, i.e. photos including text snippets that were created by typing on a film negative strip with a typewriter.

Shortly afterwards I was contacted by Richard Polt, who was then busy writing a book on the cultural phenomenon of the typewriter, asking questions like “why would anyone in our digitised world still want to use a mechanical typewriter”? He asked me whether he could use some of my Phot-O-Types in the book. Of course, I agreed.

Recently, Richard contacted me with good news.  A publisher had been found, a cover designed and a publication date agreed upon. The Typewriter Revolution is set to be published in November 2015 by The Countryman Press publishing house:

The Typewriter Revolution: A Typist’s Companion for the 21st Century, by Richard Polt, introduces you to artists, poets, makers, teens, steampunks, musicians, and more creative people who love typewriters. It also provides advice on choosing, using, and maintaining a typewriter of your own.

You can pre-order it via Amazon or any other book dealer. Head over to Richard’s blog The Typewriter Revolution or his Facebook page to stay informed about the progress.

I, for one, am looking very much forward to our new ribbon-driven typing Overlords!

Phot-O-Type: Fun with Typewriters and Film

Ever since being a kid I loved flea markets and antique stores.

Film strip on a piece of paper waiting to be typed upon.

Film strip on a piece of paper waiting to be typed upon.

I love old stuff. First, it was mainly old books. Later on I fell in love with old tools and machinery, particularly cameras, as you should know if you have been to this blog before.

However, I also own and love a 1936 Wanderer Continental typewriter that I got almost ten years ago. (It’s the one in the banner of this website.) The thing about the stuff I hoard is that I also want to use it. Otherwise it would only be old junk. I have used my typewriter extensively for creating faux historic documents for the German Call of Cthulhu roleplaying game publisher. I also used it for, err, “artistic” purposes, that is in connection with film photography. I have been meaning to write a little how-to about this for ages but never really got around to do so. Recently I discovered that there’s a whole movement of people out there who geek out about typewriters, the Typosphere. That finally made me write that article about what I call “Phot-O-Types” (*g*) and how to create them.

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